Awards and Recognitions

I Can Problem Solve (for schools)

NREPP SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices:
--I Can Problem Solve

CASEL Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning
--I Can Problem Solve, A CASEL SELect program

Office of Justice Programs / CrimeSolutions.gov
--I Can Problem Solve

Surgeon General Youth Violence Report
--I Can Problem Solve (Scroll to Strategies and Programs)

Canadian Best Practices Portal
--I Can Problem Solve

US Department of Education: Expert Panel Safe & Drug Free Schools
--I Can Problem Solve (- pages 77-79)

Find Youth Info
--I Can Problem Solve

KidsMatter - Australian Primary Schools Mental Health Initiative
--I Can Problem Solve
I Can Problem Solve has been reviewed by KidsMatter and is included on their programs guide, which can be viewed on the KidsMatter website

Other Awards/Recognitions – List

--Mental Health America (formerly National Mental Health Association): Lela Rowland Prevention Award, 1982

--American Psychological Association

  • Distinguished Contribution Award, Division of Community Psychology -with George Spivack, 1984

  • Model Prevention Program, Task Force on Promotion, Prevention, and Intervention Alternatives in Psychology – with George Spivack, 1986

  • Model Prevention Program, Task Force on Model Programs, Division of Clinical Psychology, Section, Child Psychology, and the Division of Child, Youth, and Family Services, 1993

  • Psychology Matters Initiative, For Research that Makes a Difference in People's Lives, 2004

  • Lifetime Achievement Award, Society of Counseling Psychology – Prevention Section, 2015

--National Association of School Psychologists (NASP):  Exemplary Mental Health Program, 1998

--Pennsylvania School Counselor's Association: Certificate of Recognition, for innovative, creative, and effective counseling practices developed for schools. Recognized as best practice in school counseling, 1999

--US Departments of Education and Justice:  Model Prevention Program, Annual Report on School Safety, 1999

--American Federation of Teachers (AFT):  Effective research-based discipline and violence prevention program, 2000

--New Jersey Department of Education: Character Education Program of Merit, 2000

--Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP): Recognizes ICPS as a promising program, 2012

--The New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS), 2013

The New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) Bureau of Prevention Services is pleased to announce that “I Can Problem Solve”, a prevention program for children developed and supported by Dr. Myrna Shure of Drexel University, has been added to our Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Strategies (REPS). An OASAS Evidence-based Program (EBP) Review Panel applies evidentiary standards to review new applications for the REPS. The EBP Review Panel rates the quality of evidence in prevention program outcome studies and public health impact. This supports the OASAS funded prevention services providers in identifying effective prevention programs worthy of replication and public support. The promulgation and widespread use of EBPs such as “I Can Problem Solve” will lead to consistently higher standards for state funded substance abuse prevention services. This process should increase confidence in and commitment to the use of tested and effective programs and strategies to promote positive youth development and prevent health and behavior problems among young people.

Raising a Thinking Child (training program for families) 

Strengthening America's Families: Effective Family Programs for Prevention of Delinquency
--Raising a Thinking Child

Other Awards/Recognitions – List

--Department of Health and Human Services, Mid-Atlantic Region:  recognized among the top six violence prevention programs in a five-state area (1997) 

--National Association of School Psychologists (NASP):  Exemplary Mental Health Program (1998)

--Pennsylvania School Counselor's Association: Certificate of Recognition, for innovative, creative, and effective counseling practices developed for schools. Recognized as best practice in school counseling, 1999

--New Jersey Department of Education: Character Education Program of Merit (2000)